Commentary: How Islam is an agreement with MLK Jr.’s values

newsEngin.20855733_OPED_MLKDAY-BLACKVETERANS-CI believe that the best way to celebrate a national hero is to further the cause for which they fought. Fifty years ago, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. sacrificed his life fighting for racial equality and just treatment of everyone. Half a century later, we still find ourselves fighting this war and the dream remains unfulfilled.

Today, peaceful Muslims like myself also have a dream. I fully understand that there are many people around the world that consider Islam to be an intolerant religion. From my personal experience, I believe that one of the many reasons for the injustices to exist in any society depends a lot on individual bias and prejudice. If we try to be more accepting of the diverse views and ways of life among humans around the world, only then can we hope to see peace prevailing in this increasingly restless world.

The Islam that I practice is in complete agreement with the views of the great hero who we are celebrating this Monday. King famously stated, “I look to the day when people will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.”

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER: Viewpoints delivers the latest perspectives on current events.

More than 1,400 years ago, the prophet of Islam taught this profound notion as a basic principle of Islam. Prophet Muhammad — peace and blessings be upon him — had preached, “A white has no superiority over a black, nor a black has any superiority over white except by piety and good action.”

The issue of reverse racism is also beautifully tackled here. This quote is a manifestation of complete racial justice and equality taught by Islam. As a Muslim, I am proud to say that my religion not only propagates equality but celebrates the diversity of races. The Holy Qur’an states, “And among His signs is the creation of the heavens and the earth, and the diversity of your tongues and colors” (30:23).

I firmly believe that Islam — being a universal religion and for all times — addresses all the issues faced by every society. Today, the war for equality has many fronts. We need to tackle discrimination not only on the basis of color but of religion and gender, too.

FULL ARTICLE FROM MY STATESMAN (AUSTIN, TEXAS)

Advertisements

Muslim Americans Are United by Trump—and Divided by Race

lead_960Facing increasing hostility from the administration, the religious community also has to cope with its own internal tensions.

When weary Muslims gathered in Toronto in December for an annual retreat, marking the end of a tumultuous U.S. election year, they probably didn’t expect the event to turn into a referendum on racial tensions within the American Muslim community. But it did.

One session was led by Hamza Yusuf, a well respected white scholar who co-founded Zaytuna College, which claims to be America’s first Muslim liberal-arts college. At the end, he was asked whether Muslims should work with groups like Black Lives Matter. “The United States is probably, in terms of its laws, one of the least racist societies in the world,” he replied. “We have between 15,000 and 18,000 homicides per year. Fifty percent are black-on-black crime, literally. … There are twice as many whites that have been shot by police, but nobody ever shows those videos.”

He went on. “It’s the assumption that the police are racist. It’s not always the case,” he said. “Any police now that shoots a black is immediately considered a racist.”

The backlash on social media was swift and immense. “For black Muslims, hearing this from somebody we’ve all come to love and trust—it was a cold slap in the face,” said Ubaydullah Evans, the executive director of the American Learning Institute for Muslims, who is black. He said he saw Yusuf’s comments as a way of perpetuating myths about “black pathology” and blaming African Americans for violence. Yusuf’s statements were indeed somewhat misleading: While a greater number of white people have been shot by the police compared to black people, that statistic doesn’t account for population size. When that adjustment is made, historical data shows that black people are more likely to be shot by police than white people.

FULL ARTICLE FROM THE ATLANTIC 

Farrakhan urges Christian-Muslim ties

628x471DETROIT (AP) — The black community must unite across Christian-Muslim lines and recognize the common goals among the diverse approaches of its past leaders, from Malcolm X to W.E.B. DuBois, because they all “wanted our liberation,” Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan told thousands of supporters Sunday in Detroit.

Farrakhan spoke to a packed Detroit Joe Louis Arena during his keynote address during the annual four-day Saviours’ Day convention. He touched on a range of topics, including problems facing the bankrupt host city, where the National of Islam started.

He spoke of the common reverence for Jesus that that Muslims and Christians share, and praised the work of Christian ministers in spreading the word of God. Farrakhan went through what he called his “Pantheon” of black leaders, describing how Martin Luther King, Booker T. Washington, DuBois and Malcolm X were part of a common struggle.

“All of them wanted our liberation,” Farrakhan told the crowd. “Can you hold onto the common thread that binds them all together as one?”

FULL ARTICLE FROM SF GATE