Muslims With Dubious Past Perpetuate Fear of Islam

Ergun Caner will no longer lead Liberty University’s Baptist Theological Seminary after a committee concluded the Muslim-turned-Christian has made contradictory statements about his past.

His term as dean ended Wednesday, but he will remain on the seminary faculty.

Caner had claimed he grew up as a Muslim extremist and was rescued by Jesus. Muslim and Christian bloggers had cast doubt on his story, saying that he fabricated or embellished facts about his life.

FULL STORY FROM HOUSTON BELIEF

Liberty U. removing Ergun Caner as seminary dean over contradictory statements

As he told it to church audiences across the country, Caner was entrenched in Muslim extremism when he moved to the United States from Turkey as a teenager and found Jesus. He wrote books and, after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, developed a reputation for his impassioned speeches on Muslim radicalism to largely evangelical audiences.

FULL ARTICLE FROM THE WASHINGTON POST

Conservative Christians Oppose New ‘Inter-religious’ University

Claremont School of Theology caught national attention on June 9 with the announcement of a new inter-religious university. Beginning in the fall, students at this Methodist seminary will study side by side with students from the Academy of Jewish Religion in Los Angeles and the Islamic Center of Southern California. The San Diego Jewish Journal calls it “the world’s first multi-religious graduate school.”

Of course, Claremont is not alone. Hartford Seminary boasts the Macdonald Center for the Study of Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations, the country’s oldest center of its kind. A second imam training program is being launched by the once all-Christian Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley; its website calls it “the largest and most diverse partnership of seminaries and graduate schools in the United States, pursuing interreligious collaboration in teaching, research, ministry, and service.”

FULL ARTICLE FROM RELIGIONDISPATCHES.ORG